psychology notes.

This site was originally created in 2009 as a virtual repository for all of the various psychology and therapy-related things (quotes, articles, videos, music, pictures) I came across both online and in my work as a psychotherapist. It has morphed into something slightly different in the past four years, and is now perhaps slightly more outward facing, but is still at heart a place for me to collect and share things related to the life of the mind.


Disclaimer: Posting something to this site does not mean that I necessarily agree with or endorse the opinions being expressed therein. All text on this site is informational and for educational purposes only. This site is not meant to be a substitute for professional mental health or medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified mental health provider with any questions regarding a medical condition or mental health issue. Do not disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this site.


And please, be kind to one another.


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Just finished this last night, and was quite astonished by all I didn’t know about this famous/infamous case, and the Multiple Personality Disorder craze it gave rise to following the publication of the book and the popular made-for-TV film (starring Sally Field as “Sybil”). Including how untrue almost every aspect of it was, a mutual fiction crafted by three very different women (Shirley Mason (aka “Sybil”), her psychiatrist Dr. Connie Wilbur, and the book’s author Flora Schreiber) to serve their respective—and often very different—needs and purposes.
A very interesting look at what really happened (author Debbie Nathan researched their lives in great detail, interviewed those who knew “Sybil” and Dr. Wilbur, combed through archived letters, Dr. Wilbur’s notes, and transcripts/recordings of their therapy sessions), as well as a powerful reminder of both the importance of ethics and boundaries in any therapeutic relationship and some of the more damaging—and thankfully out-dated—theories from psychoanalytic history.

Just finished this last night, and was quite astonished by all I didn’t know about this famous/infamous case, and the Multiple Personality Disorder craze it gave rise to following the publication of the book and the popular made-for-TV film (starring Sally Field as “Sybil”). Including how untrue almost every aspect of it was, a mutual fiction crafted by three very different women (Shirley Mason (aka “Sybil”), her psychiatrist Dr. Connie Wilbur, and the book’s author Flora Schreiber) to serve their respective—and often very different—needs and purposes.

A very interesting look at what really happened (author Debbie Nathan researched their lives in great detail, interviewed those who knew “Sybil” and Dr. Wilbur, combed through archived letters, Dr. Wilbur’s notes, and transcripts/recordings of their therapy sessions), as well as a powerful reminder of both the importance of ethics and boundaries in any therapeutic relationship and some of the more damaging—and thankfully out-dated—theories from psychoanalytic history.

  1. cunningaesthete reblogged this from azbees
  2. writingweasels reblogged this from mentalillnessmedia
  3. mentalillnessmedia reblogged this from psychotherapy and added:
    High up on my gratitude list is that I live in a place/time where I’ve only interacted with ethical practitioners. Holy...
  4. i-hoard-notebooks reblogged this from cornerof5thandvermouth
  5. startfresh reblogged this from psychotherapy
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  7. inverseaeon reblogged this from psychotherapy and added:
    The therapeutical techniques were actually more psychiatric than psychoanalytic. She was a psychoanalyst, yes, but the...
  8. myresin reblogged this from nocakeno and added:
    We saw this book, and I asked my parents to buy me both this an Sybil. I ended up reading this first, and I have to say...
  9. aftertrippingonthepast reblogged this from psychotherapy
  10. birdsy-purplefishes reblogged this from jollityfarm and added:
    I wish I had read this right after the book in high school psychology. I just couldn’t help but think it was bullshit....
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